July 21, 2014
therealkatiewest:

I started a fashion blog, if that’s your sort of thing. We accept submissions. From the About:

We started this blog because we believe fashion should be fun. It should make you feel amazing. We shouldn’t give a fuck what anyone thinks about what we do with our bodies and what we put on those bodies.
Full disclosure, we are not fashionistas, nor do we study fashion theory, or keep up with trends. If you’re interested in people talking critically and informatively about fashion and the industry, we suggest you check out Arabelle Sicardi and Julia Caron, two women writing about fashion in intelligent, thoughtful, critical ways. Also, if you know of more people who are doing this, please let us know so we can include them here! 
This blog is just a bunch of people who genuinely like fashion; people who think it’s fun, an adventure, a ritual, a habit that they can’t quit. 
All posts tagged “diet coke” are what we consider DAY WEAR or WORK WEAR. All posts tagged “slow jam” we consider NIGHT WEAR or FREAKUM WEAR.

dietcokeandslowjams:

To boldly go where all the space motif clothing is and then put it all on my body and then be the happiest woman in the Milky Way.
This is my new favourite outfit. My underwear was even a galaxy. I just need big space shoes to go with it and I’ll be set. Any suggestions?
**********
Sweater: Pacific Mall (Markham, ON) Leggings: Black Milk (from the beautiful Mary Taylor)

therealkatiewest:

I started a fashion blog, if that’s your sort of thing. We accept submissions. From the About:

We started this blog because we believe fashion should be fun. It should make you feel amazing. We shouldn’t give a fuck what anyone thinks about what we do with our bodies and what we put on those bodies.

Full disclosure, we are not fashionistas, nor do we study fashion theory, or keep up with trends. If you’re interested in people talking critically and informatively about fashion and the industry, we suggest you check out Arabelle Sicardi and Julia Caron, two women writing about fashion in intelligent, thoughtful, critical ways. Also, if you know of more people who are doing this, please let us know so we can include them here! 

This blog is just a bunch of people who genuinely like fashion; people who think it’s fun, an adventure, a ritual, a habit that they can’t quit. 

All posts tagged “diet coke” are what we consider DAY WEAR or WORK WEAR. All posts tagged “slow jam” we consider NIGHT WEAR or FREAKUM WEAR.

dietcokeandslowjams:

To boldly go where all the space motif clothing is and then put it all on my body and then be the happiest woman in the Milky Way.

This is my new favourite outfit. My underwear was even a galaxy. I just need big space shoes to go with it and I’ll be set. Any suggestions?

**********

Sweater: Pacific Mall (Markham, ON)
Leggings: Black Milk (from the beautiful Mary Taylor)

July 19, 2014

valvala:

jaredmorgan:

I drew this Buff Wizard. 

this wizard is me

(via rocktopussy)

July 16, 2014
July 12, 2014
holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.
These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.
These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.
An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.
I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.
At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:
“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”
Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.
Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.
It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.
The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.
At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:
How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?
These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.


YES YES YES YES YES.
(I have my own stories, which closely resemble the sort of stuff mentioned in this article.)

holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.

These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.

These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.

An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.

I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.

At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:

“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”

Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.

Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.

It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.

The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.

At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:

How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?

These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.

YES YES YES YES YES.

(I have my own stories, which closely resemble the sort of stuff mentioned in this article.)

July 10, 2014

arielia:

Every love in this house is riven by distance, time. 

Not one of the three of us is proximate to our beloveds. 

zoetica:

82-year-old model Carmen Dell’Orefice, Vogue Italia June 2013

WHAT ARE EVEN THESE SHAPES. WHA- WHAT IS HAPPENING.

(Source: sinnamonscouture, via katiereallylovesthings)

fotojournalismus:

Airstrikes in Gaza | July 2014

1. An Israeli activist carries a placard during a protest against the war on the Gaza strip, in the Israeli city of Tel Aviv on July 9, 2014. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Smoke and flames are seen following an Israeli air strike in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Reuters)

3. Palestinian relatives mourn during the funeral of members of Hamad family in the town of Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

4. Palestinians inspect the remains of a car which was hit in an Israeli air strike in Gaza City on July 9, 2014. (Ashraf Amrah/Reuters)

5. Relatives of eight Palestinian members from al-Haj family, who medics said were killed in an early morning air strike that destroyed at least two homes, mourn during their funeral in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip on July 10, 2014. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

6. A picture taken in Gaza City on July 10, 2014 shows a damaged building after it was hit by an Israeli air strike. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

7. A Palestinian woman runs carrying a girl following an Israeli air strike on a house in Gaza city on July 9, 2014. (Majdi Fathi/Reuters)

8. Two boys stand near damage caused by Israeli warplanes in Gaza on July 10, 2014. (Yasser Qudih/NurPhoto/Corbis)

9. Israelis watch as smoke rises after air strikes across the border in northern Gaza on July 8, 2014. (Amir Cohen/Reuters)

10. A Palestinian boy plays in the rubble of a destroyed house the day after an Israeli strike in the town of Beit Hanoun, northern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

(via tangledupinlace)

I’ve really tried to understand the Israelis. I used to work on a farm in Israel. I speak Hebrew. I watch their news. All the time they talk about fear. How they have to run to their bunkers to hide from the rockets. How their children can’t sleep because of the sirens. This is not a good way for them to live. We Palestinians don’t talk about fear, we talk about death. Our rockets scare them; their rockets kill us. We have no bomb shelters, we have no sirens, we have nowhere we can take our children and keep them safe. They are scared. We are dying.
July 9, 2014